The state of freight: a roundup of five fascinating stories

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In this news roundup we’re focusing on salmon, technology and global demand for fresh produce. Here are five great stories that we’ve been reading and talking about at Finnair Cargo in February 2018.

Trends in air freight: Planes are full of fresh produce

The market for fresh food is a thriving one for air-cargo companies thanks to the globalisation of eating habits. The volumes of perishables being flown—fruit, vegetables, flowers and suchlike—have risen by a third since 2007, more than for any other category of product.

Read here

 

Can home-grown Japanese inland salmon farms satisfy the unrelenting national demand for salmon?

When you think of sushi eaten in Japan you think of premium-quality Norwegian salmon flown in from the fjords, but one enterprising business man is hoping that soon he’ll be able to establish a cost-effective business farming inland salmon and challenge Norway's grip.

Read here

 

Airlines must increase their use of disruptive technology if they’re to compete with “big data” tech companies

At the Singapore Air Show, director-general for mobility and transport at the European Commission, Henrik Hololei, warned that "A tech giant who extracts customer behavior will be much better placed than an airline, for example, which only has information on its own operations."

Read here

 

What are the challenges faced by Europe’s most modern air cargo terminal and hurdles for the whole industry?

Managing Director of Finnair Cargo tells Air Cargo News that the biggest issue for the whole industry is data quality. According to Janne Tarvainen, with improved monitoring and transparency the customer benefits by knowing exactly the temperature and whereabouts of their shipment. 

Read here

 

In the 1970s Japan did not import a single fish, nor did it use salmon for sushi

These days Norway produces 1.3 million tonnes of salmon a year and much of it heads to Japan, but it wasn’t until a Norwegian member of parliament made a trip there in 1974 that the market was established. That's when Project Japan was formed and Norwegian salmon became the sushi fish of choice for many Japanese.

Read here
 

Published March 1, 2018

Category: Market updates

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